New Long-Form Content

Beating the Dead Horse of Contagionism: Enlightened Democracy vs. Medical “Superstition” in the Early American Republic

Charles Caldwell, An Anniversary Oration on the Subject of Quarantines (Philadelphia: Fry & Kammerer, 1807).

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, R15 .M38 1806 c.3

https://curiosity.lib.harvard.edu/contagion/catalog/36-990042524960203941... Read more about Beating the Dead Horse of Contagionism: Enlightened Democracy vs. Medical “Superstition” in the Early American Republic

“Justice to Our Colour Demands It”: Absalom Jones and Richard Allen’s Narrative of African Americans in Philadelphia’s 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic

Absalom Jones and Richard Allen, A Narrative of the Proceedings of the Black People, During the Late Awful Calamity in Philadelphia, in the Year 1793; and a Refutation of Some Censures, Thrown Upon Them in Some Late Publications (Philadelphia: Printed for the Authors, by William W. Woodward, 1794)

Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard University, Rare Books RC211.P5 J71

https://curiosity.lib.harvard.edu/contagion/catalog/36-990023281920203941... Read more about “Justice to Our Colour Demands It”: Absalom Jones and Richard Allen’s Narrative of African Americans in Philadelphia’s 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic

Dumbarton Oaks Gardens as Archives

A color, hand-drawn map of the Dumbarton Oaks Garden.
Ernest Clegg, Map of the Dumbarton Oaks Gardens, 1935. Dumbarton Oaks House Collection, HC.P.1935.01.(I). Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. This painting of the garden both documented the design and defined the garden as a work of art. The original is exhibited above the fireplace mantel in the Music Room, a favorite room of the Blisses.

In summer of 1921, the landscape architect Beatrix Farrand met with the art collector and patron Mildred Bliss to discuss designing the landscape for the Blisses’ new residence, which they named Dumbarton Oaks, a stone’s throw from the nation’s capital. By June of 1922, Farrand offered Bliss a rich description of their joint vision for the garden.[1] Bliss replied with a note: “Your letter and its enclosures have made us purr with contentment.”[2] While walking and talking their way across the land, the two women discovered a shared aesthetic that would be realized over the next two decades as they constructed the new gardens and landscape.... Read more about Dumbarton Oaks Gardens as Archives

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